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Tactile Hair in Manatees

  • Roger Reep
  • Diana K. Sarko
Chapter
Part of the Scholarpedia book series (SCHP)

Abstract

Tactile hairs function to detect mechanosensory stimuli rather than for warmth or protection, which is the main function of pelage hair. Vibrissae, which have a specific set of structural features, are the main class of tactile hair.

Keywords

Oral Disk Innervation Density Tactile Acuity Facial Motor Nucleus Rock Hyrax 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Internal References

  1. Llinas, R (2008). Neuron. Scholarpedia 3(8): 1490. http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Neuron.
  2. Sherman, S M (2006). Thalamus. Scholarpedia 1(9): 1583. http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Thalamus.

Recommended Reading

  1. Hughes, H C (2001). Sensory Exotica Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Atlantis Press and the author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger Reep
    • 1
  • Diana K. Sarko
    • 2
  1. 1.McKnight Brain InstituteUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Vanderbilt UniversityTNUSA

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