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Using Multiple Self Theory of Planner and Doer as a Virtual Coaching Framework for Changing Lifestyles: The Role of Expert, Motivator and Mentor Coaches

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Part of the Atlantis Ambient and Pervasive Intelligence book series (ATLANTISAPI,volume 8)

Abstract

The chapter describes a framework for virtual coaching in changing lifestyles. This is applied to the behavioral change of breaking a sedentary life style and becoming more physically active. However, the framework can also be applied to other domains of life style change that concern so called intrapersonal dilemmas. Intrapersonal dilemmas occur when people make choices that are in the best interest of themselves at the moment of choice but not in the best interest of themselves in the long run. The chapter’s thesis is that standard intentional change models are not sufficient to describe the problems underlying life style change. It is argued that when people have the intention to change their lifestyle they often behave as if they have multiple selves, e.g. a planner and a doer, that have conflicting intentions over time. An integration of several behavioral change models is presented in terms of a hierarchical internal representation of the environment. The suggested framework involves planning, commitment processes as well as post-decisional processes. The separate role of expert, motivator and mentor coaching is introduced. We conclude that a combination of intentional change theory with multiple selves theory is crucial to achieve an adequate approach of virtual coaching for the intrapersonal dilemmas behind life style changes.

Keywords

  • Physical Activity
  • Subjective Norm
  • Pedagogical Agent
  • Virtual Character
  • Virtual Agent

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Peter H. M. P. Roelofsma .

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Roelofsma, P.H.M.P., Kurt, S. (2013). Using Multiple Self Theory of Planner and Doer as a Virtual Coaching Framework for Changing Lifestyles: The Role of Expert, Motivator and Mentor Coaches. In: Bosse, T., Cook, D., Neerincx, M., Sadri, F. (eds) Human Aspects in Ambient Intelligence. Atlantis Ambient and Pervasive Intelligence, vol 8. Atlantis Press, Paris. https://doi.org/10.2991/978-94-6239-018-8_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.2991/978-94-6239-018-8_7

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