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Crowd-Control Agents

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Abstract

Chemical restraint can be used for a variety of reasons: for control of a violent individual or the agitated patient, to disperse crowds (crowd-control agents), or to limit access to specific areas. This type of control has also been used by criminals to subdue the individual in acts such as rape, robbery, and murder. The possibilities are vast, and detection of their use can be obvious, such as that with traditional tear gas or pepper spray, or may take forensic testing in cases where the person was sedated or otherwise drugged.

Keywords

  • Contact Dermatitis
  • Ocular Irritation
  • Corneal Abrasion
  • Chemical Restraint
  • Dermal Irritation

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Blaho-Owens, K. (2005). Crowd-Control Agents. In: Stark, M.M. (eds) Clinical Forensic Medicine. Forensic Science and Medicine. Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-913-3:179

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-913-3:179

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-58829-368-8

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