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Injury Assessment, Documentation, and Interpretation

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Part of the Forensic Science and Medicine book series (FSM)

Abstract

The ability to appropriately assess, document, and interpret injuries that have been sustained is a key part of the work of any forensic physician or forensic pathologist. Crimes of violence are increasing throughout the world. Nonjudicial assault, such as torture, has also become more widely recognized (1). It has been suggested that the definition of physical injury in the forensic medical context should be “damage to any part of the body due to the deliberate or accidental application of mechanical or other traumatic agent” (2). This chapter specifically addresses the issues of physical assault and the assessment and documentation of wounds or injury.

Keywords

  • Stab Wound
  • Bite Mark
  • Lead Shot
  • Entrance Wound
  • Injury Assessment

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1385/1-59259-913-3:127
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© 2005 Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

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Payne-James, J., Crane, J., Hinchliffe, J.A. (2005). Injury Assessment, Documentation, and Interpretation. In: Stark, M.M. (eds) Clinical Forensic Medicine. Forensic Science and Medicine. Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-913-3:127

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-913-3:127

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-58829-368-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-59259-913-4

  • eBook Packages: MedicineMedicine (R0)