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Ozonation

  • Nazih K. Shammas
  • Lawrence K. Wang
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 3)

Abstract

The history of ozone has been documented by several authors (1,2). Experiments conducted in 1886 showed that ozonized air can sterilize polluted water. The first drinking water plant to use ozone was built in 1893 at Oudshoorn, Holland. The French studied the Oudshoorn plant, and, after pilot testing, constructed an ozone water plant at Nice, France in 1906. Because ozone has been used at Nice since that time, Nice is often referred to as “the birthplace of ozonation for drinking water treatment” (3).

Keywords

Ozone Concentration Fecal Coliform Zebra Mussel Total Coliform Granular Activate Carbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nazih K. Shammas
    • 1
  • Lawrence K. Wang
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Graduate Environmental Engineering ProgramLenox Institute of Water TechnologyLenox
  2. 2.Zorex CorporationNewtonville
  3. 3.Lenox Institute of Water TechnologyLenox
  4. 4.Krofta Engineering CorporationLenox

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