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Halogenation and Disinfection

  • Lawrence K. Wang
  • Pao-Chiang Yuan
  • Yung-Tse Hung
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 3)

Abstract

Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine are the elements of the halogen family. Fluorine, in its oxidizing form, has no practical value in water or wastewater treatment systems. Of the other three, chlorine is by far the commonly used and thus will receive most of attention in this chapter.

Keywords

Hypochlorous Acid Enteric Virus Free Chlorine Chlorine Dioxide Chlorine Dosage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence K. Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Pao-Chiang Yuan
    • 4
  • Yung-Tse Hung
    • 5
  1. 1.Zorex CorporationNewtonville
  2. 2.Lenox Institute of Water TechnologyLenox
  3. 3.Krofta Engineering CorporationLenox
  4. 4.Technology DepartmentJackson State UniversityJackson
  5. 5.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringCleveland State UniversityCleveland

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