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The Colonial Era

Schooling under Spanish Rule, 1513–1821
  • Victoria-María MacDonald

Abstract

Formal and nonformal education in northern New Spain occurred within the context of Spanish exploration, conquest, and settlement. Conquistadores carried out these activities under the name of both the crown and the church. As historian David Weber explained, the explorers believed they could “serve God, Country, and themselves at the same time.”2 The search for gold and other riches was no less a part of Spain’s intent as it rose to international power in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Although Spaniards who pushed into the American Southwest were disappointed in their quest for material wealth, they created a permanent imprint upon Native American culture. The Spanish imposed both their language in verbal and written forms and the beginnings of formalized European education. The collision of cultures, languages, and religions over three centuries produced a new people who are the ancestors of today’s Southwestern Latinos.

Keywords

Private Tutor Spanish Language Teacher Salary Cultural Broker Colonial Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Victoria-María MacDonald 2004

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  • Victoria-María MacDonald

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