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Days of Future Past—The Peripheral Alliance

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Abstract

In 1958, Israel and Turkey forged a top secret alliance known as “the peripheral alliance” or “Phantom Pact.” Although a third party—Iran—was also involved, this chapter concentrates mainly on the first two countries, for the following reasons: the alliance, especially its strategic aspect, had a bilateral rather than trilateral character; the Israeli-Iranian linkage has been treated by some scholars and journalists; and finally, the Israeli-Turkish alliance is more relevant to the present, as it may be considered the precursor of the strategic alignment concluded between the two countries some 40 years later, in 1996. In shedding new light on an important period in the modern history of the Middle East, this study of the peripheral alliance, through archival material, interviews, and other new material, may give a better understanding of the development of regional relations in our times and of the lines of continuity and change between the two periods.

Keywords

  • Prime Minister
  • Middle East
  • Arab Country
  • Arab World
  • Foreign Minister

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Notes

  1. Baruch ‘Uziel, “The Peripheral Alliance,” Beterem (H), November 1948, pp. 8–11.

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  2. Baruch ‘Uziel, The Peripheral Alliance: A Suggestion for Israeli Policy (H) (Tel Aviv: Hamerkaz, 1959), pp. 3–31.

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  3. Aaron S. Klieman, Israel and the World after 40 Years (Washington: Pergamon-Brassey’s, 1990), p. 6.

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  4. For details on the secret track, see Aharon Klieman, Statecraft in the Dark: Israel’s Practice of Quiet Diplomacy (Jerusalem: Jerusalem Post Press, 1988), pp. 75–113.

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  5. For Shiloah’s personality and contributions to the state of Israel, see Haggai Eshed, Reuven Shiloah:The Man Behind the Mossad (London: Frank Cass, 1997).

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  19. For the “special relations” between Israel and Morocco that started clandestinely in the mid-1950s, see Bruce Maddy-Weitzman, “Israel and Morocco: A Special Relationship,” The Maghreb Review, Vol. 21, No. 1–2 (1996), pp. 36–48.

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© 2004 Ofra Bengio

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Bengio, O. (2004). Days of Future Past—The Peripheral Alliance. In: The Turkish-Israeli Relationship. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781403979452_3

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