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Leveraging Hidden Resources to Navigate Tensions and Challenges in Writing: A Case Study of a Fourth-grade Emergent Bilingual Student

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Second Language Writing in Elementary Classrooms

Abstract

During this May interview, Lizette shared her preference for writing at home rather than at school and noted some issues she has with writing in class. The first was Lizette’s wariness of having writing constantly checked for form errors. This “checking” of writing was indicative of a culture of correctness (Wong, 2014) that permeated classroom discourse around writing and emphasized mechanical correctness as an essential criterion for good writing. In contrast, during writing experiences at home, Lizette was able to align writing efforts with her own goals for learning, thinking, and expressing ideas, goals that remained invisible and untapped in her classroom writing experiences. Additionally, for Lizette, student talk in the classroom made writing experiences at school less desirable.

I like [writing] better at home because they don’t have to like, check it. You relax. Nobody’s talking.

(Lizette, Spring Interview)

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© 2016 Joanna W. Wong

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Wong, J.W. (2016). Leveraging Hidden Resources to Navigate Tensions and Challenges in Writing: A Case Study of a Fourth-grade Emergent Bilingual Student. In: de Oliveira, L.C., Silva, T. (eds) Second Language Writing in Elementary Classrooms. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137530981_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137530981_4

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-70865-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-53098-1

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