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Introduction: Memory and Imagination in the Post-Witness Era

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Abstract

Memory and imagination are the unusual companions of creative thought, the domain of creativity being located in the in-between spaces of the two faculties. Structurally very similar, memory and imagination can easily slip into one another, since displacements of the self occur both when one remembers and imagines (Sokolowski, 2000: 71). While imagination relies on memory to reconfigure the present in ways that ensures a certain commitment to remembering the past, memory has the potential to invest ‘imagination with social responsibility observable in calls to “never forget” or indictments of “never again”’ (Keightley and Pickering, 2012b: 123).1

Keywords

  • Civil Religion
  • Creative Thought
  • Holocaust Denial
  • Holocaust Memory
  • Memory Site

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2015 Diana I. Popescu

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Popescu, D.I. (2015). Introduction: Memory and Imagination in the Post-Witness Era. In: Revisiting Holocaust Representation in the Post-Witness Era. The Holocaust and its Contexts. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137530424_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137530424_1

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-57146-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-53042-4

  • eBook Packages: Palgrave History CollectionHistory (R0)