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Public Participation in Low-carbon Policies: Climate Change and Sustainable Lifestyle Movements

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Civil Society Contributions to Policy Innovation in the PR China

Part of the book series: The Nottingham China Policy Institute Series ((NCP))

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview of the two related issues of climate change and sustainable consumption and production (SCP), and how Chinese civil society organizations (CSOs) including both grassroots CSOs and think tanks are addressing these two issues. A particular focus of the chapter is on CSO participation in processes aiming to influence and contribute to policy making on national and local levels. As China’s climate change policies are a moving target and are still undergoing constant development, the chapter focuses more on trends and significant ongoing developments than on presenting an analysis of completed processes of policy innovation and public participation. The chapter first introduces the current state of the climate change problem, the interconnectedness between China and the EU on this issue through the perspective of SCP. That is followed by a general description of the background of public participation and civil society movements in the climate change issue. Then CSO initiatives on sustainable consumption, particularly lifestyle movements, are presented to ascertain the link between new social movement theories and various approaches of international movements on climate change, sustainable consumption and lifestyles. Furthermore, a comparison between China’s environmental CSOs and think tanks and ways of engagement in China’s climate change policy processes is presented, focusing in particular on the China Civil Climate Action Network (CCAN).

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© 2015 Patrick Schroeder

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Schroeder, P. (2015). Public Participation in Low-carbon Policies: Climate Change and Sustainable Lifestyle Movements. In: Fulda, A. (eds) Civil Society Contributions to Policy Innovation in the PR China. The Nottingham China Policy Institute Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137518644_4

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