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Latin American Flagship Universities: From Early Notions of State Building to Seeking a Larger Role in Society

  • Andrés Bernasconi
  • Dan Véliz Calderón
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Part of the International and Development Education book series (INTDE)

Abstract

Government ministries and other stakeholders are increasingly expecting and demanding that their national universities perform functions that transcend their traditional sense of purpose, including a role in innovation and economic development, the promotion of social equality, and fostering environmental sustainability. Some universities around the world have long engaged in this broad mission, including the great public universities in the United States; but for many other leading national universities, this so-called third mission is a relatively new concept. To date, efforts to become more engaged in the socioeconomic needs of nations simply mimic the more robust initiatives of some of the world’s leading universities (DiMaggio and Powell 1983), or simply incorporate well-meaning rhetoric aimed at influential constituents inside the university or prominent stakeholders outside.

Keywords

Latin American Country National Identity High Education System Public High Education Funding Ratio 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Andrés Bernasconi and Dan Véliz Calderón 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrés Bernasconi
  • Dan Véliz Calderón

There are no affiliations available

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