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Abstract

It is widely accepted that children and young people have the right to education for sexual health, with these rights being enshrined in the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). According to WHO (2010), knowledge and information provided through sexual health education is essential if people are to access their sexual rights and be sexually healthy. Education for sexual health — called variously sex education, sexuality education or sex and relationships education (hereafter, SRE) — involves the acquisition of information and the opportunity for young people to explore and develop their attitudes, beliefs and values as they relate to gender and sexuality, sexual and gender identity, relationships and intimacy. Sexual health education also aims to develop young people’s knowledge and skills to make informed choices regarding their behaviour, and in so doing, limit their risk and vulnerability to sexual ill-health through factors such as unwanted pregnancy, unwanted, abusive and exploitative sexual activity, unsafe abortion and STIs, including HIV.

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© 2016 Felicity Thomas and Peter Aggleton

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Thomas, F., Aggleton, P. (2016). School-Based Sex and Relationships Education: Current Knowledge and Emerging Themes. In: Sundaram, V., Sauntson, H. (eds) Global Perspectives and Key Debates in Sex and Relationships Education: Addressing Issues of Gender, Sexuality, Plurality and Power. Palgrave Pivot, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137500229_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137500229_2

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Pivot, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-69878-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-50022-9

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)

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