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Field Notes on Informality’s Culture of Ubiquity: Recognition and Symbolic Power within Informal Economic Practices in Kosovo

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Abstract

Seven giant, brightly coloured letters stand in front of the massive Palace of Youth and Sports in downtown Pristina, Kosovo. The letters spell NEWBORN and were erected in celebration of Kosovo’s unilateral declaration of independence on 17 February 2008. At the time of its creation, the monument symbolized what many people in Kosovo hoped for: a prosperous and more secure future. The monument was also a symbol of expectations held by the ‘international community’ that a renewed Kosovo would emerge. Only three years later, the NEWBORN monument had lost its glory and was covered in graffiti. For the celebration of Kosovo’s five years of independence, however, the graffiti was painted over with the flags of all countries that have officially recognized Kosovo.

Keywords

  • Business Owner
  • Informal Economy
  • Symbolic Capital
  • Symbolic Power
  • Unfair Competition

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2015 Anna Danielsson

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Danielsson, A. (2015). Field Notes on Informality’s Culture of Ubiquity: Recognition and Symbolic Power within Informal Economic Practices in Kosovo. In: Morris, J., Polese, A. (eds) Informal Economies in Post-Socialist Spaces. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137483072_6

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