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Diesel-Electric Submarine Modernization in Asia: The Role of Air-Independent Propulsion Systems

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Abstract

An important aspect of the regional “arms competition” in East Asia is the gradual introduction of new classes of conventionally-powered diesel-electric submarines, which are increasingly becoming “platforms of choice” — as force-multipliers in diverse missions as well as against superior forces. Coupled with submarine-launched anti-ship and land-attack cruise missiles, advanced intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) sensors, anti-submarine sensors and weapons, as well as new propulsion systems — such as air-independent propulsion (AIP) — these new classes of submarines have a greater capacity to remain undetected (stealth), with improved target-identification-and-attack cycle and ultimately increased mission flexibility, mobility, endurance, reach, and lethality.1 In particular, conventional submarine modernization and expansion has been profound in Northeast Asia, driven by multiple factors, including re-capitalization, replacement, reactive acquisitions, territorial and maritime boundary disputes, and great power aspirations.2

Keywords

Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Liquid Oxygen Stirling Engine Cruise Missile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Michael Raska 2016

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