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The Use of New Media by the UK’s Palestinian Diaspora

  • Amira Halperin

Abstract

The Palestinian people form a nation with a rich culture, but they are scattered throughout the world with no state of their own. This ‘stateless’ condition has a direct impact on Palestinians’ media consumption and media production. The reality in the region is harsh — conflicts within and without prevent journalists from operating freely. It is in this point that the problem lies: Palestinians’ need for information is pressing, but as it is a conflict area there are major obstacles that impede media outlets from distributing news that would answer demands for consistency, accuracy and, most importantly, real-time updates. As the literature shows, the revolution in new technology has answered the Palestinians’ demands for reception of news from home. The availability of hundreds of news websites has eased the diasporic Palestinians’ ability to access information — a fact which is highly important at times of major news events. The Palestinians in the diaspora are an active audience. They create websites and blogs to disseminate their personal stories and to receive updates from Gaza and the West Bank from the people who live there. The new technologies are bypassing geographical distance and editorial guidelines, and they help to overcome the news problem, which was significant before the Internet revolution, overcoming delays to enable the immediate dissemination of news.

Keywords

News Medium News Online Israel Defense Force Local News Palestinian Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Amira Halperin 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amira Halperin

There are no affiliations available

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