Advertisement

The Art of Survival: Social Circus, Youth Regeneration and Projected Community in the North East of Scotland

  • Graham Jeffery
  • Neill Patton
  • Kerrie Schaefer
  • Tom Wakeford
Chapter
  • 285 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter examines the creative practice of Theatre Modo in North East Scotland.2 A self-defined ‘social circus’ established in 1995, Theatre Modo works throughout Scotland from bases in Glasgow and, since 2012, Peterhead utilizing ‘high quality engagement in circus, street theatre and carnival arts as a catalyst for individual and community change’ (Theatre Modo). In 2009, Aberdeenshire Community Planning Partnership invited Modo to contribute to a ‘Youth Regeneration’ project in Peterhead and Fraserburgh, fishing towns located on the north-eastern coastline of the region with small, yet notable, pockets of multiple deprivation. Since 2009 Modo has produced an annual Fireworks Parade, a large celebratory community event coinciding with Bonfire Night, in Peterhead (Pandemonium 2009, Leviathan 2011) and Fraserburgh (Fantasmagoria 2010, Maelstrom 2012). Here we focus on the making of Maelstrom, The Shell Fireworks Parade in Fraserburgh in 2012, which was the culmination of a four-year programme of community partnership, public engagement and creative practice.

Keywords

Young People Creative Process Community Partnership Regeneration Partnership Creative Space 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. Assistant Workshop Leader (AWL) 1, 2012. Interview with N. Patton. 10 October, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  2. Assistant Workshop Leader (AWL) 2, 2012. Interview with N. Patton. 10 October, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  3. Assistant Workshop Leader (AWL) 3, 2012. Interview with K. Schaefer and N. Patton. 9 October, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  4. Crehan, K., 2011. Community Art: An Anthropological Perspective. London and New York: Berg.Google Scholar
  5. Cruikshank, B., 1999. The Will to Empower: Democratic Citizens and Other Subjects. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Danziger, M., 2012. Interview with K. Schaefer and N. Patton. 9 October, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  7. Dunnet, F., 2013. Interview with N. Patton. 15 January, Glasgow.Google Scholar
  8. Ferguson, S., 2013. Interview with N. Patton. 15 January, Glasgow.Google Scholar
  9. Gordon, D., J. Mack, S. Lansley, G. Main, S. Nandy, D. Patsios, and M. Pompati, 2013. The Impoverishment of the UK. PSE UK First Results: Living Standards, available online from http://www.poverty.ac.uk/sites/default/files/attachments/The_Impoverishment_of_the_UK_PSE_UK_first_results_summary_report_March_28.pdf, accessed 23 June 2013.
  10. Kwon, M., 2004. One Place After Another: Site-specific Art and Locational Identity Massachusetts: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  11. MacLean, K., 2012. Interview with K. Schaefer. 2 November, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  12. Marmot, M., and R. G. Wilkinson, 2003. Social Determinants of Health. The Solid Facts. World Health Organisation, available online from http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/98438/e81384.pdf, accessed 10 June 2012.Google Scholar
  13. Marmot, M., and R. G. Wilkinson, 2006. Social Determinants of Health. 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Mulligan, M., K. Humphery, P. James, C. Scanlon, P. Smith, and N. Welch, 2006. Creating Community: Celebrations, Arts and Wellbeing Within and Across Local Communities. VicHealth and Globalism Research Centre: Melbourne.Google Scholar
  15. Participant 1, 2012. Interview with N. Patton. 10 October, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  16. Participant 2, 2012. Interview with N. Patton. 10 October, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  17. Raine, J., 2012. Shell Stakeholder Welcome. 2 November, Fraserburgh Community Centre, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  18. Reaching Out Project. Aberdeenshire Community Planning Partnership, available online at http://www.aberdeenshire.gov.uk/communityplanning/AberdeenshireROA.pdf, accessed 18 September 2012.
  19. Rose, G., 1997. ‘Performing Inoperative Community. The Space and the Resistance of Some Community Arts Projects. In Pile and Keith (eds) Geographies of Resistance. London: Routledge, pp. 184–202.Google Scholar
  20. Rose, N., 1999. Powers of Freedom: Reframing Political Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Theatre Modo. Theatre Modo Website, available online at http://www.theatremodo.com/startingpage.html, accessed 12 June 2012.
  22. White, C., and L. Scott, 2012. Interview with N. Patton. 15 January, Fraserburgh.Google Scholar
  23. White, M., n.d. ‘What the Experts Think: Mike White’. In P. Devlin, Restoring the Balance. The Effect of Arts Participation on Wellbeing and Health. Voluntary Arts England, pp 19–22, available online at http://www.voluntaryarts.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Restoring-the-Balance.pdf, accessed 12 February 2013.
  24. White, M., 2009. Arts Development in Community Health: A Social Tonic. Oxford: Radcliffe.Google Scholar
  25. World Health Organisation. 2006. Social Determinants of Health, 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Graham Jeffery, Neill Patton, Kerrie Schaefer and Tom Wakeford 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham Jeffery
  • Neill Patton
  • Kerrie Schaefer
  • Tom Wakeford

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations