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Mixing Modes to Widen Research Participation

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Abstract

In this chapter, I discuss mixing online and offline modes as a means to diversify participation in social research. While Orgad (2009) has discussed adding offline to online modes, I focus on adding digital methods to an offline methodology. I argue that traditional modes of research can make it difficult for some people to participate, leading to potential sample biases.

Keywords

  • Mode Choice
  • Paper Survey
  • Rett Syndrome
  • Voice Over Internet Protocol
  • Online Mode

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© 2016 Jo Hope

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Hope, J. (2016). Mixing Modes to Widen Research Participation. In: Snee, H., Hine, C., Morey, Y., Roberts, S., Watson, H. (eds) Digital Methods for Social Science. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137453662_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137453662_5

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-55862-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-45366-2

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)