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Ghosts and the Everyday Politics of Race in Fiji

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Abstract

One early morning during a fieldwork trip to Fiji’s old capital, Levuka, in 2009, I was dragged from a deep, kava-induced sleep by loud banging on the door of the rented cabin I shared with one of my friends and respondents, Ajay.1 “Hello, hello,” someone shouted, and as our visitor did not relent, Ajay reluctantly got up to answer the door while I turned around to go back to sleep. After a brief discussion with the visitor at the door, Ajay called me to come and sort the matter out. The visitor turned out to be a young, pretty, Fijian girl. Judging by her sleepy eyes and slurred speech, I figured that she must have spent the previous night much like I had—chatting and drinking yaqona2 (kava) followed by a complimentary “wash-down,” that is the two or three long-necks of cold Fiji Bitter beer that many young Fijians consider the natural way to finish off a “grog session.”

Keywords

  • Sexual Morality
  • Ancestral Spirit
  • Racial Boundary
  • Ghostly Activity
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These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2014 Yasmine Musharbash and Geir Henning Presterudstuen

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Presterudstuen, G.H. (2014). Ghosts and the Everyday Politics of Race in Fiji. In: Musharbash, Y., Presterudstuen, G.H. (eds) Monster Anthropology in Australasia and Beyond. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137448651_8

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