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The Informal Acquisition and Development of Literacy

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International Perspectives on Home Education
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Abstract

Teaching children to read has the highest priority in primary schools; little wonder then that so much research has been devoted to finding the surest way of achieving this. For well over a century, theories have come and gone, sometimes leading to heated debates, on the best way to ensure that children become literate. Despite the variety of methods and approaches that have slipped in and out of fashion, there are two basic assumptions which the vast majority of teachers and policymakers would probably agree on. In the first place, nearly all children need to be taught to read formally and sequentially, starting with the simplest representations of English, typically found in reading schemes. Second, basic literacy should be acquired by around the age of seven; if not, then a child is said to have a problem needing specialist attention.

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Authors

Editor information

Paula Rothermel (leading scholar in the field of home education (home-schooling), Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA) and Elected Associated Fellow of the British Psychological Society (ABPS)

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© 2015 Alan Thomas and Harriet Pattison

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Thomas, A., Pattison, H. (2015). The Informal Acquisition and Development of Literacy. In: Rothermel, P. (eds) International Perspectives on Home Education. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137446855_5

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