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Aesthetics of the Banal — ‘New Aesthetics’ in an Era of Diverted Digital Revolutions

  • Christian Ulrik Andersen
  • Søren Bro Pold
Chapter

Abstract

James Bridle, who first introduced the term ‘new aesthetic’, provides a number of examples of associated cultural practices and phenomena on his Tumblr blog (Bridle 2011–). Through the images of how pixels are used in the design of T-shirts, of 3D prints that visualize how Microsoft Kinect sees a player, and satellite photos of agricultural fields appearing as mosaics, the examples point to the side effects of technology. Such cultural practices and phenomena are often brought about by cheap gadgets and services, and produce a new and positive sense of beauty, almost at the fringe of kitsch and banality (Figure 21.1).

Keywords

Critical Theory Materialist Dialectic Engaging Experience Digital Revolution Interface Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Christian Ulrik Andersen and Søren Bro Pold 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Ulrik Andersen
  • Søren Bro Pold

There are no affiliations available

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