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Pedagogical Constructivism in New Zealand Literacy Education: A Flawed Approach to Teaching Reading

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Excellence and Equity in Literacy Education

Abstract

In this chapter, we argue that no progress has been made in reducing the literacy achievement gap in New Zealand because the constructivist, multiple cues model of reading adopted by the MoE is fundamentally flawed. The chapter is divided into three sections. The first section provides an overview of the development of pedagogical constructivism in New Zealand literacy education. The second section summarizes arguments and evidence against the constructivist, multiple cues model of learning to read. The third section argues that explicit instruction in word analysis skills and strategies is helpful for all children and crucial for some, most notably struggling readers and children with limited reading-related knowledge, skills, and experiences at school entry.

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© 2015 William E. Tunmer, Keith T. Greaney, and Jane E. Prochnow

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Tunmer, W.E., Greaney, K.T., Prochnow, J.E. (2015). Pedagogical Constructivism in New Zealand Literacy Education: A Flawed Approach to Teaching Reading. In: Tunmer, W.E., Chapman, J.W. (eds) Excellence and Equity in Literacy Education. Palgrave Studies in Excellence and Equity in Global Education. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137415578_6

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