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Online Family Problem Solving for Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Shari L. Wade
  • Anna Hung

Abstract

The treatment programme and literature considered in this chapter focus on child traumatic brain injury (TBI), and it is unclear to what extent the evidence can be generalised to children and youth with brain injuries of nontraumatic origin. TBI is the most common cause of acquired disability in children, affecting approximately 500,000 children in the USA each year (Langlois et al., 2004). TBI in children may result in significant impairment in cognitive, behavioural and social functioning, especially if the injury is severe. Emerging behaviour problems occur in up to 75% of children who have sustained a severe TBI (Schwartz et al., 2003). Common cognitive sequalae include impaired attention, decreased processing speed and perseveration, as well as deficits in inhibition, planning and problem solving.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Child Behaviour Problem Social Information Processing Online Module 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Shari L. Wade and Anna Hung 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shari L. Wade
  • Anna Hung

There are no affiliations available

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