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Aliens in England: Slade, David Bowie, Ziggy Stardust and Glam Rock

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Abstract

The literature on popular music has tended to ignore the development and impact of glam rock on working-class youth culture.1 The film director Todd Haynes claims that it fell ‘through the cracks of pop cultural memory’.2 Part of the neglect of glam rock is linked to the perceived inauthentic nature of the music and the patterns of consumption associated with the genre.3 Where researchers have tackled glam rock, it has often been through biographical studies of David Bowie and Marc Bolan, and narrative histories of groups such as Roxy Music and T-Rex.4 Yet glam rock more generally contained many of the attributes of the punk rock culture that followed, was arguably more politically and socially transgressive and generated a much broader popular appeal.5

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Notes

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© 2013 Keith Gildart

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Gildart, K. (2013). Aliens in England: Slade, David Bowie, Ziggy Stardust and Glam Rock. In: Images of England through Popular Music. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384256_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384256_9

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

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