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Class, Nation and Social Change in the Kinks’ England

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Abstract

Ray Davies was one of a small group of ‘organic intellectuals’ who emerged in the 1960s seeking to explore class, nation and social change through popular music. Like Lennon and Townshend, he saw music as a way of reflecting and shaping the experiences of working-class youth and their adaptation to particular features of post-war English society. As a member of the Kinks, he traversed the country performing concerts to enthusiastic audiences and gained a particularly strong following in the industrial north.1 Davies went on to write hundreds of songs for the Kinks that transcended the simplistic subject matter of much of the popular music of the 1960s. Such recordings emphasised the importance of culture in creating and affirming social identities and can be firmly located in a ‘structure of feeling’ that remained part of the individual and collective consciousness of the English working-class.

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Notes

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© 2013 Keith Gildart

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Gildart, K. (2013). Class, Nation and Social Change in the Kinks’ England. In: Images of England through Popular Music. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384256_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384256_8

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-28582-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-38425-6

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