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Darkness over England: Punk Rock and the Sex Pistols Anarchy Tour 1976

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Abstract

There is an expansive literature on the Sex Pistols and punk rock.1 Historians tend to place the group at the centre of a particular period of ‘crisis’ in British society (1976/77) or alternatively seek to underplay punk’s significance.2 This chapter weaves between the two positions by focusing on responses to the Sex Pistols Anarchy Tour of December 1976. It presents a particular image of England in which a sense of ‘crisis’ was articulated through a range of political/social organisations and media outlets.3 The Sex Pistols were symbolic of particular shifts within popular music and youth culture. Class identity, experience and rhetoric were core features of punk rock and its attempt to challenge existing political and social orthodoxies through sound, attitude and style.

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Notes

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  41. For an excellent collection of interviews with punk musicians from across England, see J. Robb, Punk Rock: An Oral History (London, 2006).

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© 2013 Keith Gildart

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Gildart, K. (2013). Darkness over England: Punk Rock and the Sex Pistols Anarchy Tour 1976. In: Images of England through Popular Music. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384256_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384256_10

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-28582-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-38425-6

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