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U.S. Latina Feminist Paradigm: Model of an Inclusive Twenty-first Century Ecclesiology

  • Theresa Yugar
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Abstract

This chapter will engage the insights of three U.S. Latina theologians on the question of what it means to be human. They include theologian, María Pilar Aquino; Christian ethicist, Ada María Isasi-Díaz; and philosopher and systematic theologian, Michelle Gonzalez. It will highlight alternative liberative theological and inclusive interpretations of Church proposed by these three theologians that include pluralism, interrelatedness, and embodiment. It will pay particular attention to U.S. Latina theologians’ critiques of the Church and metaphors of the divine these theologians find liberative—or not. I am interested in an ecclesiology that is not hierarchical, patriarchal, or, sexist. In the twenty-first century, I contend that U.S. Latina theologians elaborate theological principles necessary to create a liberative ecclesiology that is egalitarian and pluralistic not only for U.S. Latina bodies but also for a church at large and a global world in desperate need of life-giving paradigms for all of God-creation.1

Keywords

Global World Christian Doctrine Liberation Theology Full Humanity Theological Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Grace Ji-Sun Kim and Jenny Daggers 2014

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  • Theresa Yugar

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