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In a Trinitarian Embrace: Reflections from a Local Eucharistic Community in a Global World

  • Jenny Daggers
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Abstract

The context of the chapter is an Anglican “liberal Catholic” congregation in the Church of England, within a multicultural northern UK city, where those who gather represent the diversity of the globalized, postcolonial world. The chapter highlights the relationship between Anglo-Catholic Eucharistic liturgy, with its Trinitarian form, and feminist commitment to justice-making. The exclusion of feminist reimagining from current rethinking of Trinitarian theology is challenged by affirming the place of a sparse Trinitarian rule, in order to expose heteropatriarchal contraventions of the rule and then to re-site feminist reimagining in relation to it. This enables female imagery for God to infuse, rather than displace, classical liturgical language of God as Father-Son-Spirit, and undermines deeply entrenched heteropatriarchal contraventions. The metaphor of a Trinitarian embrace reflects this opening of the received Trinitarian liturgical form. The impetus for the feminist struggle for justice is found in being swept up into Christ through the Trinitarian missio Dei, in anticipation of the abundant table spread by Divine Wisdom for all people.

Keywords

Contemporary Issue Local Church Christian Doctrine Feminist Theology Biblical Criticism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Grace Ji-Sun Kim and Jenny Daggers 2014

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  • Jenny Daggers

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