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Atheism and Science

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Abstract

In his introduction to this book, Mikael Stenmark writes:

A customized science is, roughly, a science built according to, altered to, or fitted to a particular group’s specifications—that is, the group’s needs, interests, or values, its political ideology, or worldview. It is a science governed not merely by epistemic goals, such as increased knowledge and explanatory power, but also by nonepistemic goals, such as economic growth, sustainable development, the equality of women, the end of religion, or the glory of God (p. 2).

Keywords

  • Modern Science
  • Intelligent Design
  • Christian Tradition
  • Moral Evil
  • Christian Belief

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2014 Michael Ruse

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Ruse, M. (2014). Atheism and Science. In: Fuller, S., Stenmark, M., Zackariasson, U. (eds) The Customization of Science. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137379610_5

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