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Types of Predictive Models

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Part of the Business in the Digital Economy book series (BDE)

Abstract

Predictive models come in all shapes and sizes. There are dozens, if not hundreds, of different methods that can be used to create a model, and more are being developed all the time. However, there are relatively few types of predictive models. The most common ones are:

Keywords

  • Support Vector Machine
  • Decision Tree
  • Predictor Variable
  • Predictive Model
  • Expert System

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© 2014 Steven Finlay

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Finlay, S. (2014). Types of Predictive Models. In: Predictive Analytics, Data Mining and Big Data. Business in the Digital Economy. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137379283_6

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