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Taking Liberties: Gentrification as Neoliberal Urban Policy in Dublin

Chapter

Abstract

Recent literature on neoliberal urbanism has emphasised the increasingly important role of cities as key sites of accumulation, a central aspect of which has been the accelerating volume and turnover of capital in the built environment and a more rapid transformation of urban space (Brenner and Theodore, 2005; Harvey, 2006; MacLeod and Jones, 2011). At the city scale, the production of gentrification is intrinsic to processes of accumulation and, for many urban authorities, gentrification has become a core goal of urban policy. Behind the architecture of capital investment in inner-city areas described by MacLeod et al. (2003) above, lies a deeper transformation of the social profile of areas, whereby traditional working-class populations can no longer afford to access housing locally, due largely to the increases in land and housing prices that result from influxes in capital investment and the recreation of locales for higher-class consumption. Gentrification and its pursuit is thus a highly conflictual process.

Keywords

House Price Social Housing Trinity College Residential Development Urban Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sinéad Kelly 2014

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