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Improvisation Practices and Dramaturgical Consciousness: A Workshop

Chapter
Part of the New World Choreographies book series (NWC)

Abstract

In re-presenting on the page a dance workshop, this article draws attention to what I describe as a dramaturgical consciousness within improvised dance performance. Developing this particular consciousness entails a reconfiguration of the dramaturgical and the improvisational, which allows us to understand them both as embodied practices that play with memory. The workshop takes the participant/reader through a series of activities designed to activate a sensibility through which distinctions between action and intellect, inside and outside, and past and present are productively blurred. As a practical workshop, it requires the purposeful activation of embodied thinking while foregrounding the importance of memory, perception, and composition as the bases of a dramaturgical consciousness in improvised dance performance.

Keywords

Movement Activity Implicit Memory Explicit Memory John Benjamin Improvisation Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Vida L. Midgelow 2015

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