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‘How Is Fido?’: What the Family’s Companion Animal Can Tell You about Risk Assessment and Effective Interventions — If Only You Would Ask!

  • Lynn Loar
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan Animal Ethics Series book series (PMAES)

Abstract

Early in my social work career, I was a child protective services worker in the San Francisco Bay Area. Caseloads were high and cooperation low. I worried about the decisions I had to make. If I underestimated risk, a child could be harmed, even killed; if I overestimated risk, a child could be needlessly traumatised by an unnecessary removal from the home. Yet, realistically, how much could I, or anybody, see in the single home visit on which such life-altering decisions are based? How could I build a collaborative relationship while gathering potentially incriminating evidence?

Keywords

Domestic Violence Child Abuse Companion Animal Animal Abuse Animal Cruelty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Lynn Loar 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynn Loar

There are no affiliations available

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