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Rethinking Developmental Education Policy and Practice

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Part of the Education Policy book series (EDPOLICY)

Abstract

Due to longstanding social and educational inequities across the United States, scores of students entering postsecondary education systems are identified as “underprepared” and thus required to enroll in developmental education courses. These courses are often noncredit and aim to prepare students for college-level academic work. A constant on college and university campuses, developmental education is alternately upheld and reviled by an educational system that is charged with the task of balancing opportunity with excellence, and to do so with dwindling state resources and often confounding education policies.

Keywords

Community College High Education System Academic Support Institutional Leader Degree Completion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Kathleen M. Shaw, “Remedial Education as Ideological Battleground: Emerging Remedial Education Policies in the Community College.” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 19, no. 3 (1997): 284–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Attewell, D. Lavin, T. Domina, and T. Levey, “New Evidence on College Remediation.” Journal of Higher Education 77, no. 5 (2006): 886–924.; E. P. Bettinger and B. T. Long, “Addressing the Needs of Under-Prepared Students in Higher Education: Does College Remediation Work?” NBER Working Paper No. 11325 ( Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research [NBER], 2005 ).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 7.
    Complete College America, Remediation: Higher Education’s Bridge to Nowhere ( Washington, DC: Author, 2012 ).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Tara L. Parker, Michelle Sterk Barrett, and Leticia Tomas Bustillos 2014

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