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Prophets and Presidents

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Religion, Politics, and Policy book series (PSRPP)

Abstract

Mission and prophecy have influenced American religion and politics from the beginning, and the development of Mormonism, in particular. Prophecy is a social practice found in many cultures with connections to shamanism, ecstatic vision, charismatic authority, founding myths, and social criticism. The practice is typically open to revision and can provoke intense conflict as people distinguish between true and false prophets. Prophecy often begins with a calling to public responsibility. “Prophets are messengers who announce truths their audience is invested in denying.”1 In delivering their message, prophets testify to what they have seen and typically stand in opposition to some norm.

Keywords

Presidential Candidate Civil Religion Registered Voter Religious Liberty Republican Voter 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    George Schulman, American Prophecy (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008), 5–6.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    James Morone, Hellfire Nation (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003), 129.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    James Morone, Hellfire Nation (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003), 129.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Michael Lienesch, Redeeming America: Piety and Politics in the New Christian Right (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993), 17.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    George Schulman, “American Political Culture, Prophetic Narration, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved,” Political Theory, 24.2 (May 1996): 295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Michael Lienesch, Redeeming America: Piety and Politics in the New Christian Right (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993), 43–45.Google Scholar
  7. 10.
    Richard Poll, “Joseph Smith’s Presidential Platform,” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 3.3 (Autumn 1968): 17.Google Scholar
  8. 11.
    Martin Hickman, “The Political Legacy of Joseph Smith,” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 3.3 (Autumn 1968): 23.Google Scholar
  9. 12.
    Richard Poll, “Joseph Smith’s Presidential Platform,” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 3.3 (Autumn 1968): 20.Google Scholar
  10. 13.
    Richard Poll, “Joseph Smith’s Presidential Platform,” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 3.3 (Autumn 1968): 21.Google Scholar

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© Luke Perry 2014

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