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Hallyu as a Government Construct: The Korean Wave in the Context of Economic and Social Development

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Abstract

Commonly regarded as the popularity of Korean1 popular culture overseas, Hallyu—the Korean Wave—is also considered a phenomenon of cultural production that has been used to promote Korean interests overseas, particularly in East and Southeast Asia. The Hallyu has so far consisted of various forms of production, which have, to some extent, been able to work synergistically with each other.2 Productions include film and television presentations, pop music and dance, fashion and cosmetics, video games, and food. Many of these sectors are combined within a single production through product placement and endorsement. They are part of a new phase of economic development that emphasizes the role of intellectual property and creativity in the production process and, hence, the decoupling of the cost of production and retail price. The marketing component of Hallyu products is instrumental in widening the cost-price gap and has also been used to promote Korea and Korean society in a friendly and nonthreatening manner, thereby promoting tourism and the consumption of other Korean products.

Keywords

  • Industry Policy
  • Creative Industry
  • Soft Power
  • Psychic Distance
  • Soap Opera

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2014 Yasue Kuwahara

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Walsh, J. (2014). Hallyu as a Government Construct: The Korean Wave in the Context of Economic and Social Development. In: Kuwahara, Y. (eds) The Korean Wave. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137350282_2

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