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How Ethiopia Can Foster a Light Manufacturing Sector

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Abstract

Like other low-income countries, Ethiopia aspires to catch up and become a middle-income country. It covets a modern economy which can produce more than coffee and sesame seeds and offer its 85 million citizens better livelihoods. And this is no fantasy. Economic diversification from agriculture to manufacturing and services has happened elsewhere2 and not too long ago. This paper tries to understand what the Ethiopian government will have to do to bring it about.

Keywords

  • Industrial Policy
  • Apparel Industry
  • Managerial Capital
  • Export Industry
  • Leather Product

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and should not be attributed in any manner to The World Bank, its Board of Executive Directors, or the governments they represent.

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Chandra, V. (2013). How Ethiopia Can Foster a Light Manufacturing Sector. In: Stiglitz, J.E., Yifu, J.L., Patel, E. (eds) The Industrial Policy Revolution II. International Economic Association Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137335234_21

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