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A Creative Alchemy

  • Ruth Richards

Abstract

Can creativity change us for the better? Let us hope so, for then our job is not simply to keep some unprincipled creators in rein (these malevolent creators do indeed exist; Cropley et al., 2010), while convincing others to put more effort toward a greater good. The task instead may be to help us all unfold our deepest and most positive potential.

Keywords

Human Nature American Psychological Association Chaos Theory Creative Product Creative Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ruth Richards 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Richards
    • 1
  1. 1.Saybrook University, McLean Hospital, and Harvard Medical SchoolUSA

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