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European Memory: Between Jewish and Cosmopolitan

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Cultural and Intellectual History book series (CIH)

Abstract

At the start of the twenty-first century, globalization represents a challenge to the integration of the temporal and spatial durability of what it means to be human and social in the modern age. At the same time, as a result, the basic institutions of nation-state sovereignty (like national memory) move into the foreground and with them the question of whether the developments of the past decade constitute an epochal break within modernity. History and borders may no longer be the only form of social and symbolic integration. This begs the question: do territorial, geographical, and political distinction, such as Western or Eastern Europe, or even “The West” or “The East,” make any sense in our day and age? And, crucially, what does this mean for the study of memory?

Keywords

  • Universal Declaration
  • Jewish People
  • European History
  • Genocide Convention
  • Symbolic Integration

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. Ulrich Beck and Natan Sznaider, “Unpacking Cosmopolitanism for the Social Sciences: A Research Agenda,” British Journal of Sociology, 57.1 (2006), 1–23; Ulrich Beck and Natan Sznaider, “Self-Limitation of Modernity? The Theory of Reflexive Taboos,” Theory & Society, 40.4 (2011), 417–36; Daniel Levy and Natan Sznaider, Human Rights and Memory (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2010).

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  24. A striking example is how the memory of the Holocaust has traveled to Argentina and its dealings with the dictatorship and its aftermath. The report on the so-called Desapercidos is called “Nunca Mas” (Never Again), directly borrowing the use of this term from the Dachau monument. Argentinian artists (like Julio Flores) use silhouettes to memorialize the victims of Argentinian dictatorship by consciously copying posters he encountered in Auschwitz; See Vikki Bell, “On Fernando’s Photograph: The Biopolitics of Aparacion in Contemporary Argentina,” Theory, Culture & Society, 27 (2010), 69–89. Through the use of Spanish, Argentinian memory of the Civil War is traveling back to Spain in its own dealing of the past of the Civil War. These processes of traveling/ multidirectional/cosmopolitan memories challenge the notions of divided European memories and provide a new point of view transcending the traditional gaze of divided national memories.

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© 2013 Uilleam Blacker, Alexander Etkind, and Julie Fedor

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Sznaider, N. (2013). European Memory: Between Jewish and Cosmopolitan. In: Blacker, U., Etkind, A., Fedor, J. (eds) Memory and Theory in Eastern Europe. Palgrave Studies in Cultural and Intellectual History. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137322067_4

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