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Conclusion

  • Dina Kiwan
Chapter
  • 123 Downloads
Part of the Palgrave Politics of Identity and Citizenship Series book series ( CAL)

Abstract

Throughout this book the authors have examined citizenship policy initiatives in the domains of education and naturalization in a range of societal contexts, — across Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Canada and the Middle East. Coming from different disciplinary perspectives, including education, development, political philosophy and sociology, the text has attempted to embrace a more unified and interdisciplinary approach to the study of citizenship policy initiatives in the domains of education and naturalization. As detailed in the Introduction (Chapter 1), the study of citizenship education and the study of immigration and naturalization have typically tended to be conducted separately by educationalists, and political philosophers or sociologists, respectively. The argument that such compartmentalization obscures our understandings of the commonalities in academic and policy agendas across these domains, as well as obscuring the inherently educative framing of naturalization requirements and integration discourses, underpinned the rationale for the Economic and Social Research Council’s Seminar Series ‘Education for “national” citizenship in the context of devolution and ethnic and religious conflict’ (RES-451-26-0577), out of which this book project developed.

Keywords

National Identity Arab World Citizenship Education National Citizenship Canadian Citizenship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Dina Kiwan 2013

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  • Dina Kiwan

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