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Referendums in Oceania

  • Caroline Morris

Abstract

Referendums in Oceania are generally used as a means for states to move towards or achieve independence from the colonial power, and, once independent, to change their constitution — sometimes in the details, sometimes in the fundamentals. Some states, notably New Zealand and Guam (which would appear to have little else in common), also refer questions of conscience, controversy or morality to the people.

Keywords

Electoral System Free Association Direct Democracy Marshall Island Constitutional Amendment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Cases

  1. Davis v Guam Election Commission USDC (Guam) Case No 11–00035 (2013)Google Scholar
  2. Pita v Attorney-General [1995] WSCAGoogle Scholar
  3. Vohor v Attorney-General [2004] VUCA 22Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Caroline Morris 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caroline Morris

There are no affiliations available

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