Skip to main content

Hearing Parents as Plurilingual Learners of ASL

  • Chapter

Abstract

Hearing parents of Deaf children who learn a signed language bring to the task of second language learning unique issues of social identity and investment (Norton Peirce, 1996). In addition, these parents have unique learning needs. In a Canadian context, parents of Deaf children often face distinct systemic, policy, and ideological obstacles to learning signed language. This chapter seeks to advance a framework for parents’ learning goals in light of current understanding of plurilingualism, which is defined as multilingualism at the level of the individual and which recognizes the different purposes, domains, and types of competence that the individual social actor may have in their use of two or more languages (Coste, Moore, & Zarate, 2009). This framework is intended as a response to certain academic and professional perceptions of parents’ learning of signed language as a second language as being unrealistic, unimportant, or contentious.

Keywords

  • American Sign Language
  • Deaf Child
  • Emergent Literacy
  • Linguistic Competence
  • Early Intervention Service

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1057/9781137312495_9
  • Chapter length: 22 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   59.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-1-137-31249-5
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Akamatsu, C. T. & J. F. Andrews (1993). It Takes Two to be Literate: Literacy Interactions between Parent and Child, Sign Language Studies, 81, 333–360.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bailey, C. & K. Dolby (2002). The Canadian Dictionary of ASL. Edmonton, AB: University of Alberta Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Beazley, S. & M. Moore (1995). Deaf Children and Their Families: Dismantling Barriers. London: David Fulton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bourdieu, P. (1977). The Economics of Linguistic Exchanges, Social Science Information, 16, 645–668.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Calderon, R. (2000). Parental Involvement in Deaf Children’s Education Programs as a Predictor of Child’s Language, Early Reading, and Social-Emotional Development, Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 5(2), 140–155.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carbin, C. F. (1996). Deaf Heritage in Canada: A Distinct, Diverse and Enduring Culture. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cassell, J. (1996). Bravo ASL! Curriculum Instructor’s Guide. Salem, OR: Sign Enhancers, Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  • Coste, D., D. Moore, & G. Zarate (2009). Plurilingual and Pluricultural Competence: Studies towards a Common European Framework of Reference for Language Learning and Teaching. Strasbourg: Language Policy Division.

    Google Scholar 

  • Council of Europe (n.d.). Language Education Policy. Retrieved May 5, 2012 from: http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/division_EN.asp

  • Dammeyer, J. (2010). Psychosocial Development in a Danish Population of Children with Cochlear Implants and Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children, Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 15, 50–58.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Delk, L. & L. Weidekamp (2001). Shared Reading Project: Evaluating Implementation Processes and Family Outcomes. Washington, DC: Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Centre.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fjord, L. (1999). ‘Voices offstage:’ How Vision has become a Symbol to Resist in an Audiology Lab in the U.S., Visual Anthropology Review, 15, 121–138.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gibson, H., A. Small, & D. Mason (1997). Deaf Bilingual Bicultural Education, in J. Cummins & D. Corson (eds) Encyclopedia of Language and Education, Volume 5: Bilingual Education, pp. 231–240. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heath, S. B. & B. Street (2008). On Ethnography: Approaches to Language and Literacy Research. New York: Teachers College Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Heller, M. (2006). Linguistic Minorities and Modernity, 2nd Ed. London, UK: Continuum.

    Google Scholar 

  • Johnston, T., G. Leigh, & P. Foreman (2002). The Implementation of the Principles of Sign Bilingualism in a Self-Described Sign Bilingual Program: Implications for the Evaluation of Language Outcomes, Australian Journal of Education of the Deaf, 8, 38–46.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kushalnagar, P., T. D. Topolski, B. Schick, T. C. Edwards, A. M. Skalicky, & D. L. Patrick (2011). Mode of Communication, Perceived Level of Understanding and Perceived Quality of Life in Youth Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 16, 512–523.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lane, H. (2005). Ethnicity, Ethics and the Deaf-World, Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 10, 291–310.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lartz, M. N. & L. J. Lestina (1995). Strategies Deaf Mothers Use When Reading to Their Young Deaf or Hard of Hearing Children, American Annals of the Deaf, 140, 358–362.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Leigh, G. & T. Johnston (2004). First Language Learning in a Sign Bilingual Program: An Australian Study, NTID Research Bulletin, 9(2/3), 1–5.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mahshie, S. N. (1995). Educating Deaf Children Bilingually: With Insights and Applications from Sweden and Denmark. Washington, DC: Pre-College Programs, Gallaudet University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mather, S. (1989). Visually Oriented Teaching Strategies with Deaf Preschool Children, in C. Lucas (ed.) Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community, pp. 165–187. New York: Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maxwell, M. (1984). A Deaf Child’s Natural Development of Literacy, Sign Language Studies, 44, 191–224.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mayer, C. & G. Leigh (2010). The Changing Context for Sign Bilingual Education Programs: Issues in Language and the Development of Literacy, International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 13, 175–186.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McLaughlin, L., J. Cripps, & A. Small (2006). ASL Eye Spy Handshapes. Toronto, ON: Ontario Cultural Society of the Deaf and Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf.

    Google Scholar 

  • Myers, L. R. & P. Hulsebosch (1997). Communicating across Cultures: The Deaf Parent to Hearing Parent Project, Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.

    Google Scholar 

  • Napier, J., G. Leigh, & S. Nann (2007). Teaching Sign Language to Hearing Parents of Deaf Children: An Action Research Process, Deafness and Education International, 9(2), 83–100.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Neese Bailes, C. (2001). Integrative ASL-English Language Arts: Bridging Paths to Literacy, Sign Language Studies, 1(2), 147–174.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Norton Peirce, B. (1996). Social Identity, Investment and Language Learning, TESOL Quarterly, 29, 9–31.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Peterson, P. R. (2007). Freedom of Speech for Deaf People, in L. Komesaroff (ed.) Surgical Consent: Bioethics and Cochlear Implantation, pp. 165–173. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Slee, R. & J. Allan (2001). Excluding the Included: A Reconsideration of Inclusive Education, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 11, 173–191.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Snoddon, K. (2008). American Sign Language and Early Intervention, Canadian Modern Language Review, 64, 581–604.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Snoddon, K. (2009). American Sign Language and Early Literacy: Research as Praxis. Doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    Google Scholar 

  • Snoddon, K. (2012). American Sign Language and Early Literacy: A Model Parent-Child Program. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swanwick, R. & L. Watson (2007). Parents Sharing Books with Young Deaf Children in Spoken English and in BSL: The Common and Diverse Features of Different Language Settings, Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 12, 385–405.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Takala, M., J. Kuusela, & E.-P. Takala (2000). ‘A Good Future for Deaf Children’: A Five-Year Sign Language Intervention Project, American Annals of the Deaf, 145, 366–373.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Valli, C. & C. Lucas (1995). Linguistics of American Sign Language: An Introduction, 2nd Ed. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van der Lem, G. J. & D. E. Timmerman (1990). Joint Picture Book Reading in Signs: An Interaction Process between Parent and Deaf Child, in S. Prillwitz & T. Vollhaber (eds) Sign Language Research and Application: Proceedings on the International Congress, March, pp. 77–90. Hamburg, Germany: Signum Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Watkins, S., P. Pittman, & B. Walden (1998). The Deaf Mentor Experimental Project for Young Children who are Deaf and their Families, American Annals of the Deaf, 143, 29–35.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Young, A. M. (1997). Conceptualizing Parents’ Sign Language use in Bilingual Early Intervention, Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2, 264–276.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Young, A. M. (1999). Hearing Parents’ Adjustment to a Deaf Child: The Impact of a Cultural-Linguistic Model of Deafness, Journal of Social Work Practice, 13, 157–176.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Children’s Books Cited

  • Carle, E. (1987). The Very Hungry Caterpillar. New York: Philomel.

    Google Scholar 

  • Johnston, L. (2009). Farley Follows his Nose. New York: Harper Collins Children’s Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keats, E. J. (1962). The Snowy Day. New York: Puffin Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sendak, M. (1963). Where the Wild Things Are. New York: Harper Collins Children’s Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stinson, K. (2006). Red is Best. 25th anniversary edn. Richmond Hill, ON: Firefly Books.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2014 Kristin Snoddon

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Snoddon, K. (2014). Hearing Parents as Plurilingual Learners of ASL. In: McKee, D., Rosen, R.S., McKee, R. (eds) Teaching and Learning Signed Languages. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137312495_9

Download citation