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The Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Health: A Meta-Analysis

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Abstract

Epidemiologists have long been aware that social and environmental factors can contribute to the incidence of many human diseases. Predictably, as the single activity occupying most people’s waking time is work, pressures, strains, and stresses within the workplace have been identified as being a potentially important health factor. Numerous theories now exist, developed from a wide range of perspectives, postulating a direct link between organisational/workplace stress and wellbeing.1

Keywords

  • General Mental Health
  • Effect Size Statistic
  • Managerial Psychology
  • Combine Correlation
  • Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2013 E. Brian Faragher, M. Cass, and Cary L. Cooper

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Faragher, E.B., Cass, M., Cooper, C.L. (2013). The Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Health: A Meta-Analysis. In: Cooper, C.L. (eds) From Stress to Wellbeing Volume 1. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137310651_12

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