Advertisement

Human Resource Management in the Central and Eastern European Region

  • Rūta Kazlauskaitė
  • Ilona Bučiūnienė
  • József Poór
  • Zsuzsanna Karoliny
  • Ruth Alas
  • Andrej Kohont
  • Ágnes Szlávicz

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to examine recent developments of human resource management (HRM) practices in the Central and Eastern European (CEE) region and to compare these against the similarities and differences of their national contexts.

Keywords

Human Resource Management Uncertainty Avoidance National Culture Difference Human Resource Management Difference Business Strategy Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alas, R. & Svetlik, I. 2004. ‘Estonia and Slovenia: Building modern HRM using a dualist approach’. In C. Brewster, W. Mayrhofer & M. Morley (eds), Human Resource Management in Europe: Evidence of Convergence? London: Elsevier, 353–83.Google Scholar
  2. Aposporia, E., Nikandrou, I., Brewster, C. & Papalexandris, N. 2008. ‘HRM and organizational performance in Northern and Southern Europe’. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19: 1187–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barrett, R. & Mayson, S. 2007. ‘Human resource management in growing small firms’. Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, 14: 307–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Brewster, C. 2007. ‘Comparative HRM: European views and perspectives’. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 18: 769–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brewster, C., Morley, M. & Bučiūnienė, I. 2010. ‘The reality of human resource management in Central and Eastern Europe’. Baltic Journal of Management, 5: 145–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Cakrt, M. 1993. ‘Management education in Eastern Europe: Toward mutual understanding’. Academy of Management Executive, 4: 63–8.Google Scholar
  7. Edwards, T. & Rees, C. 2006. International Human Resource Management: Globalization, National Systems and Multinational Companies. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.Google Scholar
  8. Erutku C. & Valtee, L. 1997. ‘Business start-ups in today’s Poland: Who and how?’ Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 9: 113–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. European Commission. 2010. Industrial Relations in Europe 2010. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union.Google Scholar
  10. Garavan, T., Morley, M. & Heraty, N. 1998. ‘Managing human resources in a post-command economy: Personnel administration or strategic HRM’. Personnel Review, 27: 200–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gooderham P. & Nordhaug, O. 2011. ‘One European model of HRM? Cranet empirical contributions’. Human Resource Management Review, 21: 27–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hüttinger, M. 2008. ‘Cultural dimensions in business life: Hofstede’s indices for Latvia and Lithuania’. Baltic Journal of Management, 3: 359–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Ignjatovic, M. & Svetlik, I. 2003. ‘European HRM clusters’. EBS Review, Autumn: 25–39.Google Scholar
  14. Jarjabka, A. 2011. ‘Similarities and differences in company cultures of Eastern-Europeans’. In J. Poôr, P. Boday & V. Kispalne (eds), Trends and Tendencies in Human Resources Management in Eastern Europe (in Hungarian). Budapest: Gondolat Publishing House, 76–100.Google Scholar
  15. Karoliny, Z. 2008, Z. 2008. ‘Reframing the contextual approach based on the experiences gained on analysing empirical findings of HR practices of the new capitalism in Central Eastern Europe’. International Conference on New Trends and Tendencies in the Human Resource Management—East meets West (Pécs: University of Pécs, Faculty of Business and Economics, 13–14 June 2008 ).Google Scholar
  16. Kazlauskaité, R. & Bučiūnienė, I. 2010. ‘HR function developments in Lithuania’. Baltic Journal of Management, 5: 218–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Koubek, J. 2009. ‘Managing human resourcing in the Czech Republic’. In. M. Morley, N. Heraty & S. Michailova (eds), Managing Human Resources in Central and Eastern Europe. London: Routledge, 132–57.Google Scholar
  18. Larsen, H.H. & Brewster, C. 2003. ‘Line management responsibility for HRM: What’s happening in Europe?’ Employee Relations, 25: 228–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lewis, P.C. 2005. How the East Was Won. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  20. Lucas, R., Marinova, M., Kucerova, J. & Vetrokova, M. 2004. ‘HRM practice in emerging economies: A long way to go in the Slovak hotel industry?’ International Journal of Human Resource Management, 15: 1262–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Mayrhofer, W. & Brewster, C. 2005. ‘European human resource management: Researching developments over time’. Management Revue, 16: 36–62.Google Scholar
  22. Michailova, S., Heraty, N. & Morley, M.J. 2009. ‘Studying human resource management in the international context: The case of Central and Eastern Europe’. In M.J. Morley, N. Hearty & S. Michailova (eds), Managing Human Resource in Central and Eastern Europe. London: Routledge, 1–24.Google Scholar
  23. Nikandrou, I., Apospori, E. & Papalexandris, N. 2005. ‘Changes in HRM in Europe–A longitudinal comparative study among 18 European countries’. Journal of European Industrial Training, 29: 541–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Noorkoiv, T. & Gröön, T. 2004. ‘Corporate social responsibility: The concept and its status regionally and nationally in Central and Eastern Europe and Estonia’. EBS Review, Winter/Spring: 59–72.Google Scholar
  25. Pearce, J.L. 1991. ‘From socialism to capitalism: The effects of Hungarian human resources practices’. Academy of Management Executive, November, 4: 75–89.Google Scholar
  26. Pieper, R. 1992. ‘Socialist HRM: An analysis of HRM theory and practice in the former socialist countries in Eastern Europe’. The International Executive, 34: 499–516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Poór, J., Engle, A. & Gross, A. 2010. ‘Human resource management practices of large multinational firms in Hungary 1988–2005’. Acta Oeconomica, 60 (4): 427–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Poór, J., Karoliny, Z., Alas, R. & Vatchkova, E.K. 2011. ‘Comparative international human resource management (CIHRM) in the light of the Cranet Regional Research Survey in Transitional Economies’. Employee Relations, 33: 428–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Pundziene, A. & Bučiūnienė, I. 2009. ‘Managing human resources in Lithuania’. In M.J. Morley, N. Heraty & S. Michailova (eds), Managing Human Resource in Central and Eastern Europe. London: Routledge, 55–89.Google Scholar
  30. Sorge, A. 2004. ‘Crossnational differences in human resources and organisation’. In A.W. Harzing & J.V. Ruysseveldt (eds), International Human Resource Management. London: Sage Publications, 117–40.Google Scholar
  31. Soulsby, A. & Clark, E. 1998. ‘Controlling personnel: Management and motive in the transformation of the Czech enterprise’. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 9: 79–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Sparrow, P.R. & Hiltrop, J.M. 1997. ‘Redefining the field of European human resource management: A battle between national mindsets and forces of business transition?’ Human Resource Management, 36: 201–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Sparrow, P.R., Schuler, R.S. & Jackson, S.E. 1994. ‘Convergence or divergence: Human resource practices and policies for competitive advantage’. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 5: 267–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Stajić, D. 2006. Modernizacija sindikata (The modernization of trade unions). Beograd: Institut za politicˇke studije (Institute for Political Studies).Google Scholar
  35. Svetlik, I. 2009. ‘Managing human resources in Slovenia’. In M.J. Morley, N. Heraty & S. Michailova (eds), Managing Human Resource in Central and Eastern Europe. London: Routledge, 219–42.Google Scholar
  36. Szerb, L., Richbell, S. & Vitai, Z. 2010. ‘HRM in the Hungarian SME sector’. Employee Relations, 3: 262–80.Google Scholar
  37. Zupan, N. & Kase, R. 2005. ‘Strategic human resource management in European transition economies: Building a conceptual model on the case of Slovenia’. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 16: 882–906.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Rūta Kazlauskaitė, Ilona Bučiūnienė, József Poór, Zsuzsanna Karoliny, Ruth Alas, Andrej Kohont and Ágnes Szlávicz 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rūta Kazlauskaitė
  • Ilona Bučiūnienė
  • József Poór
  • Zsuzsanna Karoliny
  • Ruth Alas
  • Andrej Kohont
  • Ágnes Szlávicz

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations