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EU and the Export of Gender Equality Norms: Myth and Facts

  • Alison E. Woodward
  • Anna van der Vleuten
Chapter
Part of the Gender and Politics Series book series (GAP)

Abstract

On the occasion of 50 years of the European Union, one of the ten most important achievements of the Union was claimed to be the progress made in terms of gender equality (BBC 2007). With its formal laws and advancements in terms of monitoring the position of women and men in Europe (EIGE 2013), the EU claims to be a world leader and role model (EU 2007) and is convinced that:

Through all relevant policies under its external action, the EU can exercise significant influence in fostering gender equality and women’s empowerment worldwide. (DG Justice External Relations Gender Equality; http://ec.europa.eu/justice/gender-equality/development-cooperation/index_en.htm)

Keywords

Civil Society Gender Equality Female Genital Mutilation Promote Gender Equality Violence Against Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Alison E. Woodward and Anna van der Vleuten 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison E. Woodward
  • Anna van der Vleuten

There are no affiliations available

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