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Putinism pp 171–188Cite as

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Putinism and Bonapartism: The Ten Resemblances

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Abstract

In Parts I and II we analyzed the dynamics of Putinism in the first 12 years of its existence. These dynamics point to a Kremlin-sponsored growth of ultra-nationalism, the exaltation of a national “rebirth” and a strong, centralized state, the foundation of an ugly nationalist youth movement, the massive violation of human rights in Chechnya, and military adventurism and territorial annexationist policies abroad. These dynamics seem to fit Griffin’s minimal definition of fascism, as well as my amended version of this minimal definition. However, Putinism still differs in some important aspects from the fascist ideal type. And here the comparison with two other political systems can, eventually, shed more light. It is the comparison with Bonapartism on the one hand, and with Berlusconism on the other. We will analyze the resemblance with Bonapartism in this chapter, and the resemblance with Berlusconism in the next.

Keywords

  • Democratic Legitimacy
  • National Consensus
  • Secret Police
  • Independent Judiciary
  • Popular Sovereignty

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Certain persons say: the Empire means war; I say, the Empire means peace.1

Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte

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Notes

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© 2013 Marcel H. Van Herpen

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Van Herpen, M.H. (2013). Putinism and Bonapartism: The Ten Resemblances. In: Putinism. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137282811_11

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