Skip to main content

Absenteeism and Presenteeism

  • Chapter
Presenteeism
  • 480 Accesses

Abstract

Absenteeism is defined as the failure to report for scheduled work (Johns, 2002). Reason for an unscheduled absence could be either medical or non-medical (Aronsson, Gustafasson and Dallner, 2000; Lowe, 2002; Simpson, 1998). In the past, managers used to assume that work attendance equated to performance, which is actually not true (refer to Chapter 2 for an explanation on this issue). Some authors also argue that significant productivity losses due to absenteeism do not result from major or chronic health issues alone but can be associated with common health problems (Barnes et al., 2008). Gosselin, Lemyre and Corneil (2013) argue that health-related loss of productivity can be traced equally to workers showing up at work as well as to workers choosing not to.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • D.N.M.A. Abdullah and O.Y. Lee (2012) ‘Effects of wellness prog ra ms on job satisfaction, stress and absenteeism between two groups of employees (Attended and not attended)’, Procedia: Social and Behavioral Sciences, LXV, 479–484.

    Google Scholar 

  • G. Aronsson, K. Gustafasson and M. Dallner (2000) ‘Sick but yet at work: an empirical study of sickness presenteeism’, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, LIV, 502–509.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • L. Aston (2010) ‘Helping workers help themselves’, Occupational Health, LXII (11), 29–31.

    Google Scholar 

  • D.R. Avery, P.F. MacKay, D.C. Wilson and S. Tonidandel (2007) ‘Unequal attendance: relationships between race, organizational diversity cues, and absenteeism’, Personnel Psychology, LX (4), 875–902.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • C. Barham and N. Begum (2005) ‘Sickness absence from work in the UK’, Labour Market Trends, April. London: Office for National Statistics, 149–158.

    Google Scholar 

  • M.C. Barnes, R. Buck, G. Williams, K. Webb and M. Alywood (2008) ‘Beliefs about common health problems and work: a qualitative study’, Social Science and Medicine, LXVII, 657–666.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R.L. Bertera (1990) ‘The effects of workplace health promotion on absenteeism and employment costs in a large industrial population’, American Journal of Public Health, LXXX (9), 1101–1105.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • S. Brown and J.G. Sessions (1996) ‘The economics of absence: theory and evidence’, Journal of Economic Surveys’ Research in Labor Economics, 23–53, XXXVI, 109–157 (cited in K. Pouliakas and Theodorpoulos, 2012).

    Google Scholar 

  • CIPD and Simplyhealth (2012) Absence Management: Annual Survey Report, 5–24. London, U.K.: CIPD and Simplyhealth.

    Google Scholar 

  • L. Davis, K. Loyo, R. Schwertfeger, A. Glowka, L. Danielson, C. Brea, A. Eston and S. Griffin-Blake (2009) ‘A comprehensive worksite wellness program in Austin, Texas: partnership between steps to a healthier Austin and Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority’, Preventing Chronic Disease, VI (2), A60.

    Google Scholar 

  • K. Dew, V. Keefe and K. Small (2005) ‘Choosing to work when sick: workplace presenteeism’, American Journal of Health Promotion, LX, 2273–2282.

    Google Scholar 

  • E. Finkelstein, C. Fiebelkorn and G. Wang (2005) ‘The cost of obesity among full-time employees’, American Journal of Health Promotion, XX, 45–51.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • D.M. Gates, P. Succop, B.J. Brehm, G.L. Gillespie and B.D. Sommers (2008) ‘Obesity and presenteeism: The impact of body mass index on workplace productivity’, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, L (1), 39–45.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R. Goetzel, S.R. Long, R.J. Ozminkowski, K. Hawkins, S. Wang and W. Lynch (2004) ‘Health, absence, disability, and presenteeism cost estimates of certain physical and mental health conditions affecting U.S. employers’, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, XLVI (4), 398–412.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • E. Gosselin, L. Lemyre and W. Corneil (2013) ‘Presenteeism and absenteeism: differentiated understanding of related phenomena’, Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, XVIII (1), 75–86.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • R.M. Henke, R.Z. Goetzel, J. McHugh and F. Isaac (2011) ‘Recent experience in health promotion at Johnson & Johnson: lower health spending, strong return on investment’, Health Affairs, XXX (3), 490–499.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • G. Johns (2002) ‘Absenteeism and mental health’, in J.C. Thomas and M. Hersen (Eds), Handbook of Mental Health in the Workplace. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 437–455.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • A.-K. Lokke, J.K. Eskildsen and T.W. Jensen (2007) ‘Absenteeism in the Nordic countries’, Employee Relations, XXIX (1), 16–29.

    Google Scholar 

  • G. Lowe (2002), ‘Here in Body, Absent in Productivity’, Canadian HR Reporter, XV (21), 5, 8.

    Google Scholar 

  • J.N. MacGregor, B.J. Cunningham and N. Caverley (2008) ‘Factors in absenteeism and presenteeism: life events and health events’, Management Research News, XXXI (8), 607–615.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • M.L. Marzec, T. Golazewski, S. Musich, P.E. Powers S. Shewry and D.W. Edington (2008) ‘Effects of environmentally focused interventions on health risk and absenteeism’, International Journal of Workplace Health Management, IV (3), 200–215.

    Google Scholar 

  • L. Makrides, S. Smith, J. Allt, J. Farquharson, C. Szpilfogel, S. Curwin, P. Veinot, F. Wang and D. Edington (2011) ‘The healthy life works project: a pilot study of the economic analysis of a comprehensive workplace wellness program in a Canadian government department’, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, LIII (7), 799–805.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • C. Pfeifer (2010) ‘Impact of wages and job levels on worker absenteeism’, Internal Journal of Manpower, XXXI, 59–72.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • B.M. Popkin, S. Kim, E.R.S Du Rusev and C. Zizza (2006) ‘Measuring the full economic costs of diet, physical activity and obesity related chronic diseases’, Obesity Reviews, VII, 271–293.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K.P. Parbotteeah, H.M. Addae and J.B. Kullen (2005) ‘National culture and absenteeism’, International Journal of Organizational Analysis, XIII (4), 343–361.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • K. Pouliakas and N. Theodoropoulos (2012) ‘The effect of variable pay schemes on workplace absence’, Research in Labor Economics, XXXVI, 109–157.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • J.A. Ricci and E. Chee (2008) ‘Lost productive time associated with excess weight in the US workforce’, Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, XLVII, 1227–1234.

    Google Scholar 

  • R. Simpson, (1998) ‘Presenteeism, power and organizational change: long hours as a career barrier and the impact on the working lives of women managers’, British Journal of Management, IX, 37–50.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • P. A. Schulte, G.R. Wagner, A. Ostry, L.A. Blanciforti, R.G. Cutlip, K.M. Krajnak, M. Luster, A.E. Munson, J.P. O’Callaghan, C.G. Parks, P.P. Simeonova and D.B. Miller (2007) ‘Work, obesity, and occupational safety and health’, American Journal of Public Health, XCVII (3), 428–436.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • P. Spurgeon, P. Mazelan, F. Barwell and H. Flanagan (2007) ‘New directions in managing employees: an employee-based approach’, CIPD and Active Health Partners, 9–20.

    Google Scholar 

  • N. Sullivan (2008) ‘Sickness absence’, employee benefits/HAS healthcare research, Section III, 10–13.

    Google Scholar 

  • J.G. Trogdon, E.A. Finkelstein, T. Hylands, P.S. Della and S.J. Kamal-Bahl (2008) ‘Indirect costs of obesity: a review of the current literature’, Obesity Reviews, IX, 489–500.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • P. Tynan (2011), ‘Executive health: all present’, New Zealand Management, XLVI.

    Google Scholar 

  • A.M. Wolf and G.A. Colditz (1998) ‘Current estimates of economic cost of obesity in the United States’, Obesity Reviews, VI, 97–106.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • www.wellnessProposals.Com, accessed on 13 May 2013.

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Copyright information

© 2013 Hesan Quazi

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Quazi, H. (2013). Absenteeism and Presenteeism. In: Presenteeism. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137275677_3

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics