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The Militarization of Society: Compulsory Service, the National Service League, and Progressive Politics

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Abstract

In December 1868 Macmillan’s Magazine described for its readers the manifestations of ‘Prussian militarism’ that had been established in the Rhineland over the previous half-century:

You see in the most retired villages — places which seem the very ideal of pastoral tranquillity — the well-known inscription on the first and last house announcing the company and regiment of the Landwehr for which the villagers are recruited, and the military law is everywhere rigidly executed and submissively obeyed.1

Keywords

  • Military Service
  • National Defence
  • Military Training
  • Social Reform
  • Universal Service

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© 2013 Matthew Johnson

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Johnson, M. (2013). The Militarization of Society: Compulsory Service, the National Service League, and Progressive Politics. In: Militarism and the British Left, 1902–1914. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137274137_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137274137_5

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, London

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