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Careers of Early- and Mid-career Academics

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Abstract

Even if higher education institutions (HEIs) have been subject to important changes in the last few decades, it is undeniable that today, as in the emergence of the modern higher education (HE) systems enhanced by the Humboldtian revolution, producing and disseminating knowledge is one of their main missions (Etzkowitz & Leydesdorff 2000; Olssen & Peters 2005; Santiago et al. 2008). However, what is considered scientific knowledge is still the subject of epistemological and ontological discussion. There has been a discernible shift from the positivist perspective that maintains it is possible to obtain objective and true knowledge by using scientific methods to more recent discussion about the possible existence of a reality that is external to the individual (Alvesson & Sköldberg 2003; Foucault 2002). These newer approaches question the important relationship between the production of knowledge and notions of power and control, and feminist writers have strongly contributed to this debate (Hekman 1992; Alvesson & Sköldberg 2003; O’Connor 2012). Studies of women in science reveal how the role of women in science and HE has been neglected, mainly because science and HE reproduce the dominant stereotypes in society (Rose 1994; Oakley 1997; Schiebinger 1999).

Keywords

  • Academic Career
  • Participatory Action Research
  • High Education Policy
  • Academic Management
  • Academic Woman

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2013 Teresa Carvalho, Özlem Özkanli, Heidi Prozesky and Helen Peterson

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Carvalho, T., Özkanli, Ö., Prozesky, H., Peterson, H. (2013). Careers of Early- and Mid-career Academics. In: Bagilhole, B., White, K. (eds) Generation and Gender in Academia. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137269171_7

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