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The Context

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Abstract

The careers of women academics remain a focus of gender research because women often have different career paths from male colleagues and continue to be under-represented at senior levels. While the percentage of women enrolling in undergraduate courses has increased steadily in recent decades, including in medicine and the life sciences which were traditionally male-dominated, women are over-represented at the lower levels of academia. Higher levels of women in undergraduate courses have not translated into a change in the gender composition of those in more influential academic positions that include responsibilities such as supervising postgraduate students and conducting research. In fact, women are far from achieving parity with men in professorial positions (Goransson 2011).

Keywords

  • European Union
  • Gender Equality
  • Career Path
  • Academic Career
  • Gender Equity

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2013 Barbara Bagilhole and Kate White

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Bagilhole, B., White, K. (2013). The Context. In: Bagilhole, B., White, K. (eds) Generation and Gender in Academia. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137269171_1

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